Author Topic: Domitude  (Read 1176 times)

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ABer

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Domitude
« on: August 18, 2020, 09:08:50 PM »
Hi Jeremy - I've seen the facebook post you made about this subject. Could you give some more details please. The calculation seems to be quite like the Ptolemaic primary directions module I did. Thanks. Ed

Nefgem

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Re: Domitude
« Reply #1 on: August 18, 2020, 09:37:58 PM »
Ed
I will try although I am not good at calculs and astronomy.
I translate some part of this the French text and there is the calculation at the end
but the idea of this is great
I think some softs do this calcul

pdf
http://www.astrologie-rao.com/wp-content/uploads/2010/08/La-domitude-Danièle-Jay.pdf
__________________________________
""
The sky is not identical seen from Paris, Beijing or New York, on the same day, at the same time of TU 3
The position of the stars in these three skies is not similar, although their longitude is
strictly identical. To account for this difference in position, it is therefore necessary
introduce a tracking system, other than that of the position on the ecliptic. To know
where the stars really are, and this is even more true for those that are in
outside the zodiac, we must resolutely place ourselves in the local sphere, which has as its center the place
observation or birth considered. The stars, like all celestial bodies, are
driven by the movement of the sphere: they "rise" on the eastern horizon, go towards
their "culmination" as the diurnal movement transports them to the MC, "lie down"
on the western horizon. The stars therefore also change position depending on the time of observation
or by birth, it is obvious to anyone who looks at the sky at night. They have a position in
a theme, no longer spotted in the cosmos but in world


Domitude chart consists in calculating their “domitude”, neologism coined by Dom Néroman (domus = house, domitude = position in house). These two methods use a different calculation and vocabulary (the hourly distance measures the position of the stars in temporal hours starting from the meridian, the domitude measures it in degrees of right ascension in the direction of the succession of signs, taking l 'eastern angle) as

A l’AS est donc attribuée la valeur de 0°000. A la cuspide de II, 30°.
A la cuspide de III, 60°.
A la cuspide de IV, 90°.
A la cuspide de V, 120°.
A la cuspide de VI, 150°.
A la cuspide de VII, 180°.
A la cuspide de VIII, 210°.
A la cuspide de IX, 240°.
A la cuspide de X, 270°.
A la cuspide de XI, 300°.
A la cuspide de XII, 330°.
A la cuspide de I (AS), 360° soit 0°.


the latitudes in the world reveal aspects if not invisible.

In the Theme  example (pdf) the Sun and Mercury are both united with the great beneficial Jupiter by sextile in the world, while they are not in the zodiac. Thus domitude provides valuable information, which may be sorely lacking if one sticks to the ecliptic. These configurations are therefore of immense interest: they reveal in the movement of the sphere what disappears from sight in the zodiac! As Francis Santoni says so nicely, “domitude allows you to revisit your theme by discovering unsuspected qualities.


In conclusion, we can say that "the taking into account of domitudes is absolutely necessary for astrology" (Francis Santoni, conference of Lyon), which certainly would not deny Yves Lenoble who was the first in France to be interested in the subject. , then Bernard Villemin and Jean-Christophe Vitu, and others who will undoubtedly forgive me for not citing them. Domitudes reveal “the exact position of each planet in its diurnal movement” (Yves Lenoble, op.cit.). They allow very rapid identification of conjunctions
« Last Edit: January 26, 2021, 01:17:41 PM by Nefgem »
Cordialement Jeremy ( Paris )

Nefgem

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Re: Domitude
« Reply #2 on: August 18, 2020, 09:41:23 PM »
Calculation

1) For celestial bodies located in the 1st or 2nd quadrant above the horizon, the formula will be as follows:


___

where the DM (meridian distance) to SAd (diurnal semi-arc) ratio is applied to the 90 ° of the quadrant, the value obtained being added to 270 ° (MC) for a star located in the 1st quadrant (AS-MC), subtracted 270 ° for a star located in the 2nd quadrant (MC-DS).
« Last Edit: August 18, 2020, 09:50:30 PM by Nefgem »
Cordialement Jeremy ( Paris )

Nefgem

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Re: Domitude
« Reply #3 on: August 18, 2020, 09:45:38 PM »

2) For celestial bodies located in the 3rd or 4th quadrant below the horizon, the formula will be as follows:

___________


where the DM (meridian distance) to SAn (nocturnal semi-arc) ratio is applied to the 90 ° of the quadrant, the value obtained being added at 90 ° (FC) for a star located in the 3rd quadrant (DS-FC), subtracted 90 ° for a star located in the 4th quadrant (FC-AS).
Cordialement Jeremy ( Paris )

Nefgem

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Re: Domitude
« Reply #4 on: August 18, 2020, 09:48:57 PM »
Example: calculation of the domitude of Venus (1st quadrant), in the chart of Roland Petit:
radix: january 3 1924 / 11h00 TU / Villemomble 2E30  48N53

MD of Venus: 46 °, 21 (right ascension of Venus - right ascension of MC); SAd of Venus: 71 °, 32 (90 ° - DA, in negative declination);
90 ° multiplied by 46.21 and divided by 71.32 = 58.31;
Domitude of Venus: 328 °, 31 (270 ° + 58 °, 31), or 328 ° 20 ’.
Cordialement Jeremy ( Paris )

ABer

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Re: Domitude
« Reply #5 on: August 18, 2020, 09:57:40 PM »
OK Jeremy - I'll see what I can do. I don't think this is difficult to code. I have a few other jobs to do first however, I will post updates here for you. Ed

Nefgem

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Re: Domitude
« Reply #6 on: August 18, 2020, 10:07:59 PM »
hey Ed honestly this wasn't asking for a code. but I did not know if it existed maybe in PD
It seems to be more French than Anglo Saxon. certain would be delighted, me too.
you have other more urgent tasks or job
in short, if you like the idea great, when you will have the time.

Thks anyway
Cordialement Jeremy ( Paris )

Jean

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Re: Domitude
« Reply #7 on: August 18, 2020, 11:41:55 PM »
great to see, thanks.
Greetings from Groningen Netherlands <º)))><¸.·´¯`·.¸><(((º>

ABer

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Re: Domitude
« Reply #8 on: August 19, 2020, 07:54:24 AM »
Hi Jeremy - I think the closest you have at the moment is Horoscope-Extra-Gauquelin. This will superimpose the Gauquelin sectors on the main chart wheel. Placidus cusps can be used as a proxy for the Gauquelin sectors as the method of division is very similar to the Gauquelin's methodology. I also think the domitude method is very close to the Gauquelin/Placidus logic. They all seem to be based on proportional semi-arcs. Placidus cusps (12 and 11), for example, are based on dividing the semi-arc of each degree from rising to culminating into three; the intermediate cusps are the degrees that are exactly 1/3 (12th) and 2/3 (11th) through their rising semi-arcs. If you have a different understanding let me know. Ed

ABer

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Re: Domitude
« Reply #9 on: August 19, 2020, 08:15:34 AM »
Petit's horoscope shows the issues quite well. If you look at the local horizon horoscope, the Moon is clearly shown below the horizon, despite being in the 12th house by eclipitic longitude. The domitude corrected chart shows the moon below the ascendant using the corrected position. Interesting. See the screenshot attached. Ed

Nefgem

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Re: Domitude
« Reply #10 on: August 19, 2020, 11:06:15 AM »
that's it exactly, and a planet with high latitude like pluto is often misplaced in relation to astronomical reality ( minimal distance eciptic  in scorpio) when it is at the maximum of its ecliptic distance ( taurus )or moon in its variations. fixed stars between them etc
aspects between planets also change
« Last Edit: August 19, 2020, 11:57:42 AM by Nefgem »
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Nefgem

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Re: Domitude
« Reply #11 on: August 19, 2020, 11:54:04 AM »
edit
yes division per 3
« Last Edit: January 26, 2021, 01:15:58 PM by Nefgem »
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Nefgem

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Re: Domitude
« Reply #12 on: August 19, 2020, 12:18:11 PM »
other excerpts
http://mapage.noos.fr/astrolabe/latitude.htm
Let us observe Mars on our celestial sphere. This will describe, in its diurnal movement, an arc of a circle parallel to the equator, starting from the south-eastern horizon (not visible on our diagram), passing to the meridian (point M) and setting at a point located to the southwest (point B): this is called its diurnal arc (10). The "length" of it depends on the declination of the star and the latitude of the place.
The value of the diurnal semi-arc (angle between point M and point B) is given by the formula:
Cos (SAD) = - Tg D Tg Phi
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Nefgem

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Re: Domitude
« Reply #13 on: August 19, 2020, 12:20:46 PM »
where D is the declination of the star and Phi the geographic latitude of the place.
This semi-arc is only worth 6 hours for a star located on the equator. In this case the diurnal arc is equal to the nocturnal arc and the "days" of the star are equal to its "nights". The notion of domitude is very close to that of planetary hour (11): let us cut this semi-arc into three equal parts, we obtain three iso-hourly diurnal houses (i.e. traversed by the star in equal times). Domitude expresses the proportion between the hour angle (12) (reduced to its dial, that is to say to a value less than 90 °) and the value of the semi-arc on which this star is located. Needless to say, domitude can only be calculated for rising stars. The following table gives the formula for domitude in the four possible scenarios (13):

It is counted in the direct direction from the east, and this to follow the traditional order of the houses (14), and it is there that it separates from the planetary hours which, for their part, are counted from the east in the daytime direction (clockwise!). Time in time is related to domitude by the formula:


Hour = 4 x (360 - Domitude) / 60
« Last Edit: August 19, 2020, 12:37:27 PM by Nefgem »
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Nefgem

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Re: Domitude
« Reply #14 on: August 19, 2020, 12:25:32 PM »
It is by abuse of language that we note the domitude in degrees, because this one really represents a measurable angle only for a star located on the equator, in this case the diurnal arc is worth 180 ° (12 hours ), and the domitude then corresponds to a sort of hour angle which would be measured in the direct direction from the East point. In all other cases the domitude cannot be assimilated to an angle, its values go from 0 to 180 for the nocturnal houses and from 180 to 360 for the daytime houses, the culmination being identified by the value 270, each house being worth 30.


proportion the domifications of planets were wrong
error %

Pluton
26.6 %
Lune
7.5 %
Vénus
4.2 %
Mercure
4.2 %
Saturne
3.6 %
Mars
3.0 %
Neptune
2.7 %
Jupiter
2.0 %
Uranus
1.3 %
Soleil
0 % (of course)
Cordialement Jeremy ( Paris )